Moonrats, Fiction Fragment II

Script for page one of a graphic novel.

Page Layout
Three standard rectangular frames. One large, half to 2/3 of page. Two small frames underneath. The margins around the frames are illustrated with a design that represent the lunar surface. As the location of the action changes from page to page, the design in the margin changes. Each location has a different design, as in Fables.

Frame One
Large atrium space. Center floor filled with couches, table, seats, etc. Plants, trees, even a patch of grass. Combination of hotel lobby, public plaza, food court. A place were people come to hang out. To the left, a wall of rooms with balconies overlooking the space. To the right, a passageway to other areas. People milling and sitting. Chatter.

The scene is dominate by a large window that shows the lunar surface. The earth hangs in the sky in the the classic 3/4 full position. There is no doubt that the observer is on the Moon.

At the bottom of the frame to the left, is the check-in desk/concierge area. It is in plain sight, but the reader should overlook it due to the splendor of the surroundings.

Purpose of frame. To have a space that a reader will immediately recognize as a luxurious and desirable. The reader should want to be there. This sets them up to find out that the permanent residents, i.e. Moonrats, reject everything the space stands for. Moonrats do not believe in wasted air. They do not believe in recreating the earth on the Moon. They definitely prefer to have several feet of rock between them and vacuum.

Frame Two
Close-up of check-in desk. Two people are standing close together behind the desk. Very close. One is either resting an arm on the other’s shoulder &/or they have arms around each other’s waists. Friendly, not amorous. They are watching the crowd. Clearly bored. Separated from the rest of the people by physical distance, dress, and attitude.

They are wearing black jumpsuits, black sunglasses, and black caps. The intent is thick, woolly garments rather than sleek, spy suits. (Not sure what the material is yet. What can ya make out of Moon rock?)

Purpose of frame. To show how Moonrats dress. They find non-Moonrat (Earthling? Barbarian? Gravity Granny?) spaces to be too cold and too bright. Because they live in confined spaces, Moonrats have zero personal space among each other. They are almost always touching or resting a hand/arm/leg on the person(s) they are with. (Pretty sure the idea of touching comes from The Quiet People in Whispers Underground by Ben Arronovitch. I took it farther.)

Frame Three
Check-in desk again. One person walking out of frame, quitting time. Sound bubble with ‘bye. Other person touching them on the shoulder in passing. No words. Moonrats should have a different font when speaking to each other. Softer. Quieter. Lower case?

Purpose of frame. Stage direction to get character out of this place to the next place. Arranged to show more Moonrat behavior. I am making the assumption that life on the Moon requires constant watchfulness. Lights are dim so that warning lights show up, see sunglasses above. Sound is kept to a minimum to listen for warning alerts and to monitor life support machinery. The way a householder notices when the heat comes on. Therefore, Moonrats speak softly and briefly. If talking has replaced social grooming, Moonrats have gone back the other way. They mostly talk to convey essential information and then use touch instead of chatter.

Page two will show the transition to a different type of lunar habitat, where the Moonrats live.

Moonrat lifestyle is based on two premises:

1) Living space will be the most expensive resource in a lunar habitat.

2) Privacy is a relatively modern notion.

Now, if I could only draw.

Previous Lunar Bits
[Origins of the Lunar Colony, Plot Fragment]
[Moonrats, Fiction Fragment]

Stay safe. Stay sane.
Katherine Walcott

Categories: Art, graphic design, Off Topic

3 replies »

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