Horse Hunt, 2 of 2

The second Quarter Horse was older, less fancy, but full of can-do spirit. He didn’t have pin-up conformation but moved better than he stood. He could trot out briskly or shuffle along at a jog. We asked the rider to take him over a pole. He a) was able to adjust and b) seemed to look forward to a challenge. Probably would enjoy jumping, at least to the extent one can extrapolate a course of fences from a pole on the ground. Not the type to set the world on fire, but would motor happily around the lower levels of dressage, eventing. and local hunters.

Except.

He had the most enormous hunter’s bump. It looked as if a chestnut weasel was taking a nap on the top of his butt. The lump was so large that the line from the point of the croup to the top of the tail was almost concave. It didn’t appear to affect his way of going, although it was more pronounced at the jog than at the trot.

I flagged it as Do Not Pass Go but don’t know that much about the condition. I’ve heard that it is conformational, muscle strain, and/or a problem/not a problem. I figure why start with an issue?

Still, this horse and yesterday’s horse [1 of 2] were both priced sensibly and I would have given either one stall space if fate had sent them trotting up our driveway. That’s an improvement from some. We have seen trop cher horses that I would not have touched for free. I don’t understand horse selling, I truly don’t.

What think you, did I make the right call re the hunter’s bump?

Categories: Horse Shopping, Horses, Physiology

4 replies »

  1. Haha I don’t understand either! In The Netherlands horses are almost given away for free now. The market is so bad! However, (good) quarter horses or well-trained dressage/show jumping horses remain at a high price…

      • Haha no worries! The QH’s are usually ridden Western style, yes. Maybe you’ve heard about Rieky Young? She’s a very well-known and talented western rider. Western is maybe not as popular in The Netherlands as Dressage or Show Jumping but it’s getting there!

  2. Talk to vet about the bump. One of my Dad’s best had a “jumping bump” like that and cleared some awesome fences. If you’re not going to do conformation hunters, I don’t think it matters as long as it doesn’t interfere with soundness. Before passing it up, I’d check with vet. Also, did you get on horse? What did it feel like when you were on? If you didn’t get on, suggest getting a ride on it and see what you can sense.

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