Blog Logo, Weaving Digitally

Images

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Three stages of weaving on a screen, showing the progression as weave gets tighter.

Top. Holes are as wide as bands.

Middle. Holes are half the size of bands.

Bottom. Holes are one-quarter the size of bands.

I like how the three images show the difference as the holes get smaller. The top looks like a how-to weaving diagram. The bottom looks more woven.

Process notes. Inkscape. Weaving images by brute force. Made little blocks. Copied them. Moved them around. Resized them. The letter filling was equally inelegant. Piled weave blocks on top of each other until they filled an area the size of the letter. Couldn’t figure out how to crop the weaving to the letter. Could figure out how to crop a simple rectangle to the letter. Repeat. Made a mask. Stuck it between the black letter outlines and the blobs of weaving. Turned it white, voila background. GIMP to change file type.

The colors were chosen as temporary filler. By the time I got done mashing everything together, it was no longer possible to Select Same > Fill Color in Inkscape. I could select by color in GIMP but transferring files between the two programs leaves the edges of the objects blurry. The edge pixels are slightly different colors. Too much work to change half a dozen tones. Green & brown it is.

Down The Rabbit Hole

A far more complicated approach yielding far more complicated images, “To produce these simulated textiles, I wrote a simulated loom in software.” Andrew Glassner: Digital Weaving

Computer control of physical fibers. “The TC-2 is a handloom … The heddles are lifted by vacuum and are controlled digitally.” Digital Weaving USA: Resources

Stay safe. Stay sane.
Katherine

2 thoughts on “Blog Logo, Weaving Digitally

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